All posts tagged: Junior Achievement USA

Trade School: A College Alternative in 2019

By Hannah Henry, Manager of Marketing & Public Relations, Brand
Junior Achievement USA

A survey conducted by Gallup and Strada Education Network revealed that 36% of those who attended college regret their choice of major. Of those who pursued or completed a bachelor’s degree, findings uncovered that 40% would pick a different field of study. That’s roughly $25,000 a year, for a student who is in-state attending a four-year university, to decide that their degree was not the best choice for them.

According to Mark Danaher, a career counselor at Newington High School in Newington, Connecticut, “My feeling is that high school students don’t have to know the exact career they want, but they should know how to explore careers and put time into investigating them and learning about their skills and interests.”

At 18 or 19, we are expecting teens to know their career-path and putting a hefty price tag on pursuing what they believe is the right option for them. But, are they being given all their options? All the while, some teens may not be exposed to alternatives outside of attending colleges, such as vocational schools.

To assist in the discovery of which path is right for you or your teen, here is an overview of how trade schools could be the perfect fit!

The Difference Between Trade and Vocational Schools

Vocational and trade schools are similar in nature as they both offer an accelerated path to get into a specific career. While most use them interchangeably as an educational institution that teaches individuals for a particular skill set, some identify them as having smaller differentiations. According to the U.S. Department of Education, technical schools teach the theory and science behind an occupation, while vocational schools may take a more hands-on approach to teach skills.

The Unique Perks of Attending a Trade School

Unlike traditional colleges, trade schools focus on one specific area of “trade” learning. This hyper-focus on a specific skill enables trade-schools to offer smaller classrooms with more one-on-one learning opportunities for the students. Additionally, vocational schools educate students of industry-specific rules and regulation, as well as real-work experiences to enable them to get familiar with the type of work they are pursuing.

The amount of time it takes to successfully complete trade school is another perk to this vocational path. While programs vary, vocational training can go from as little as ten weeks. In turn, this makes this educational career path highly appealing to those who are seeking to get into a profession as soon as possible.

With the unique benefits of vocation schooling, this route isn’t just for those who have graduated high school but also for those who are planning to enter a specific industry for the first time, reenter the workforce, and for those who are seeking to change their career path. The diversity amongst trade school students enables them to network and learn from one another, creating an inclusive learning environment.

Current Demand for Skilled Trades in 2019

A large majority, 70%, of construction companies across the country are having trouble finding qualified workers and construction isn’t the only industry suffering. It is estimated that every day for the next decade, 10,000 baby boomers will be reaching retirement age and will be leaving specialized positions in which fewer workers can fill. Luckily for trade schools, their robust skill-focused programs offer a bright future. Careers that will be experiencing more and more demand for skilled labor include:

–     Carpenter

Total new job openings: 83,800

Average salary: $51,120

–     Plumber

Total new job openings: 75,200

Average salary: $58,150

–     Electrician

Total new job openings: 59,600

Average salary: $59,190

Click here to explore possible career paths!

Think the trade-school path is right for you? Click here to learn more!

Program Introduces High Schoolers to Career Paths, Including Skilled Trades

Junior Achievement of South Florida offers its program JA Career Bound to high school students in South Florida. JA Career Bound is a cutting-edge, skills-building leadership program where participants learn the skills necessary to succeed in today’s workforce.

After an opening retreat, students meet once a month for program days focused on specific industries. Students visit some of South Florida’s premier businesses to learn firsthand about the career opportunities and what companies are looking for in future employees. Students learn from top executives who share their journeys to success.

We use interactive JA curriculum to teach key work skills, including communication, critical thinking, goal setting, interviewing, personal branding, problem-solving, public speaking, resume building and teamwork. At the end of the year, students will have the opportunity to put their skills into action by participating in various paid internships with job shadowing. For further details, including registration, CLICK HERE

 

Trade School: A College Alternative in 2019
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Elementary Milestones for Future Success

By Hannah Henry, Manager of Marketing & Public Relations, Brand
Junior Achievement USA

From Kindergarten to fifth-grade, most children do not have a clear understanding of finances or money in general. What they learn at this stage in life are concepts that will continue to build as they grow older. While at this stage in their lives, they don’t have bills or loans to worry about, it puts their financial future on the horizon and gives them something to think about as they get older.

To put your child ahead of the curve, there are countless ways to introduce every-day transactions and learning-moments! Here are the primary milestones that elementary students are struggling with and ways that you can get your child more confident with outside of the classroom:

Grocery Store

While at the grocery store or any place of business, there are tons of opportunities to show your child the thought process and money concepts you use to make your decisions. Be sure to take a few seconds when you’re deciding between two items to discuss what you are using to determine which product or service is better than the other and why you are choosing a particular one. As you go down an aisle that contains products that are not a necessity but are something you want, discuss the difference between needs and wants. Include how by picking a want you may be sacrificing another product that was also want (or even a need) on your list, explain that this concept is called opportunity cost.

Once your shopping trip has been brought to the register, note that while you know everything has a cost, your child might not. Explain to him or her that all of the products you picked up at the store have a cost as well as taxes that are added to them. The taxes that are included are called sales tax, which states and local governments impose that help pay for schools, roads, police and fire departments. While the concept of taxes goes far deeper than this, it will begin to create the foundation for further growth and understanding in the future. This is also a perfect time to explain to your child what method of payment you are choosing and why. This will get him or her more familiar with money options available in the economy.

Banking

Before exposing your child to the concepts or mortgage companies, credit unions, and investment banks, start with the primary institution where money is held, your local bank or even internet banking app. This is the heart of financial literacy as children learn how savings, currency, deposits, and types of money typically start their journey here.

Tell your child what you want to accomplish while you are at the bank and what you will have to do in order to accomplish this goal. When depositing a check, tell your child about the deposit form you fill out and what it will do when it is processed through the system.This is also a great time to set your child up with a savings account; this will teach him or her that it is never too early to start and that by beginning early, they are preparing for their future.

Home

Finally, after the trip to the bank and the grocery store, you’re home. The place where families come together to discuss their day, what they did, learned, and what they are excited for in the future. This is the perfect place for conversations of budgeting/money management and charitable giving goals!

A survey conducted by the American Psychology Association found that 95% of those surveyed believe parents should talk to their children about money, yet only 64% said they were taught to manage money correctly, and 37% responded that they speak with their family members on the subject of money. There lies an area of opportunity for you and your family to come together.

Budgeting is one of the most important pieces when it comes to financial success. Creating a budget, managing the budget, and sticking with the budget. Bring your children into the conversation when you are creating the family budget. If you don’t create one, now would be a great time to start! Include all of the living expenses like home/mortgage, utilities, car costs, insurance, etc. From there examine what is being spent on the non-urgent resources included in your family’s every-day living. By doing this, you’re not only enlightening your child to the real world of the expense of life, but you are also enabling them to start a habit of their budgeting and saving for the future.

If your child receives an allowance, be sure to convey that while their money circulates throughout the world, it is in their hands to determine what to do with it. Are they wanting to spend it, save it, or perhaps give it to a charity? These money decisions should be your child’s as they worked for it. Be sure to provide them with some advice as to what it could go towards long-term versus short-term, or what it could accomplish by assisting an organization that seeks to make changes locally or globally.

With all of these opportunities to share your knowledge of money with your elementary school child, you are not only arming him or her with the knowledge to make better decisions for the future, but you are assisting them to develop on concepts that are crucial to future development.

For a list of resources for your elementary school student, check out Junior Achievement of South Florida’s programs here!

Elementary Milestones for Future Success
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